Soldera Toscana Sangiovese 2013

soldera

  • Great Domaines
    93
  • Corney & Barrow
    18.5

all ratings out of 100 points.

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At Great Domaines, we get allocations of certain wines. This means that certain wines are assigned to particular recipients. Anyone can be a recipient, but often there are waiting lists. Click on the button below to mail us, and we will contact you on how to get onto the list for this particular product.

R 6,200

 
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Tasting Note:

"Wonderful deep yet transparent ruby colour*. Decadently sweet fruited attack on the nose, bright and pure. A deliciously welcoming nose of, mostly, red fruits with a little white pepper and damson. The sweetness on the palate is kept perfectly in check with a moreish salinity. The tannic structure is there but you have to look for it, perfect in balance. Every sip brings new layers. Latterly there is a fresh wet beef element to the nose adding further complexity. Quite some wine this, wonderful. A wide drinking window as ever!" - Corney & Barrow

 
FactSheet
FactSheet:

Composition:
100% Sangiovese
Drink Date:
2019 - 2040+
Alcohol:
13%

Slavonian oak vats for more than 5 years

Body:
Medium–Full

Which glass?
Zalto Bordeaux

Decant it?
yes

 
Vineyards & vinification
Vineyards & vinification:

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Soldera Toscana Sangiovese 2013

Sangiovese, Soldera, Brunello, Italy, Red, 750ml

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About the Producer

Established in the early 1970s by Gianfranco and Graziella Soldera, Case Bassa is an estate in the southwest area of Montalcino, where Sangiovese Grosso vines are grown to produce the famous Brunello di Montalcino. Their daughter, Monica, is now also completely involved in the estate. The 12 hectares of vines are suitably placed on high-altitude, south facing slopes with a dry and sunny climate, which give their vines excellent conditions to flourish.

Taking a more technical approach to their farming techniques, the vineyards and the wines are subject to continuous study by the agriculture faculties of various universities. An electronic switchboard constantly monitors climate changes over the course of the year, reporting temperature, humidity and quantity of rain. Daily controls during the wine-making stage are performed by the microbiology department of the University of Florence. The same faculty studies and controls all phases of the production cycle, monitoring the wine all the way from grape, to bottle, to palate.

In spite of their high-tech approaches, the vineyards are managed with a respect for traditional rules. The vineyards are kept small to permit manual cultivation and to allow for a speedy harvest. The vines are pruned short in the winter, with another green pruning during the growing season. Grape thinning and limited leaf-stripping in the autumn provide more light for the grape clusters and excellent fruit ripening. No herbicides are used, and each row of vines is cultivated by hand.

Once in the cellar (14 metres underground), natural fermentation using indigenous yeasts takes place in large 15 000-litre Slavonian oak vats. Fermentation is up to a month in duration, using only the free-run juice. Aging takes place in 25 hectolitre Slavonian oak, in some cases for up to six years. The winery’s underground location allows for natural circulation of air and keeping the humidity at a constant 85%.

Soldera’s key philosophy is “if you want to make the best, time is the most important element.” This philosophy, in both vineyard and cellar, has given birth to one of the most genuine and delicate expressions of Brunello de Montalcino in Tuscany today.

We were fortunate to become their importers in 2013, just before their cellar was vandalised and the majority of their production from the 2007 - 2012 vintages were destroyed. This was a tragedy, and we now wait with bated breath for our next allocation in 2019.

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