Type / Red Wine

Showing 1–24 of 188 results

Newton Johnson Felicité Pinot Noir 2020

R115.00 inc. VAT
"The Newton Johnson family are specialists in the growing and making of the Burgundian grape varieties of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The Felicité range offers access to fine examples of these wines at prices that won’t break the bank. Discovering Pinot Noir wines can be a supremely rewarding experience, some say the ultimate. The fragrant fruit of Pinot Noir is ever distinct; and the silky, elegant texture is what seduces you in to what may be called the ‘Queen of wines’." Producer's note

Keermont Merlot 2018

R220.00 inc. VAT
"The Keermont Merlot 2018 has a deep royal red colour. Beautiful dusty, ripe strawberry fruit nose with notes of dried herbs, cigar box and cinnamon. The palate is soft, but clean and elegant. The wine exudes flavours of ripe red fruit with undertones of orange rind and dried herbs. Soft chalky tannins and good natural acidity help to maintain a fresh elegance and a long, succulent dry finish."

Newton Johnson Walker Bay Pinot Noir 2019

R240.01 inc. VAT
"Our village Pinot Noir" is how Gordy Newton Johnson describes this very tasty red, sourced from the younger and lower-lying blocks on the farm and from Bot River. Fresh and juicy, it's a Cape version of a Chorey-lès-Beaune, with a touch of whole bunch spice and freshness and pure redcurrant and red cherry flavours." – Tim Atkin

Keermont Syrah 2015

R264.99 inc. VAT
"The 2015 Keermont Syrah, containing 13% Mourvèdre, is softly floral with a dark-fruited edge and subtle black pepper spices. The medium-bodied palate is clean with a firm blackberry core that turns tart and grippy as it lingers in the mouth, finishing long and structured with tannic grip." - Anthony Mueller, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

Keermont Syrah 2016

R265.01 inc. VAT
"The Keermont Syrah 2016 has a dark plummy red colour. It has an enchanting bouquet of lavender, cherries, cloves, and vanilla. The palate is elegant and soft with dark strawberry and cherry flavours and hints of citrus rind, herbs, and vanilla. The tannins are light, but firm and the wine has a long rich savoury finish." Winemaker's notes

Château de Saint Cosme Côtes-du-Rhône Rouge 2019

R275.00 inc. VAT
While the 2019 Cotes du Rhone is not a single-estate wine (it's labeled simply Saint Cosme, without the "Château de"), this 100% Syrah is a perennial bargain—and this could be its best vintage to date. Aromas of violets, cracked pepper, cassis and blueberries leap from the glass, while the medium to full-bodied palate is ripe but silky, leading into a long, mouthwatering finish. A blend of fruit from the Gard (the right bank of the Rhône) and Vinsobres (the left bank, about 400 meters above sea level), it retains a sense of freshness not often found in Syrahs from the Southern Rhône.

BLANKbottle Saint Rand 2018

R280.00 inc. VAT
"Back in 2015 an old varsity friend referred me to a farmer called Boetie van Reenen. Not long thereafter a farmer whom I buy grapes from, as well as a fellow winemaker, referred me to the same guy. So with 3 solid referrals, I met with this Darling farmer who apparently had some really interesting opportunities when it came to varietals like Cinsaut and Chenin. In year 1, I bought some Chenin from him. Then, in year 2 (2016), the Retirement@65 vineyard came on board and finally, in 2017, a Pinotage vineyard. When it comes to reds, Pinotage is the first to ripen. Unfortunately, its early sweetness attract birds from the mountain and they feast on the grapes. In the past, the farmer had therefore been forced to pick the 37-year old vineyard early, on a low sugar, before the birds came. But that meant that the grapes were not ripe yet and could only be used for the making of rosé. To prevent the bird-fest, I then purchased some bird nets and the farmer covered the little bush vines with it - it worked. BLANKBOTTLE Saint Rand 2018 - my first straight Pinotage. You all know the story of our recent trip to Marseille with our film Epileptic Inspiration. To solidify our memories and to keep us going until the awards ceremony on 14 October in Paris, I thought it good to name a wine after our adventure. Saint Rand is the registered name of our PTY Ltd. - Saint Rand Productions (tongue-in-cheek upper class name for our very humble but wonderful home town - the Strand). I appreciate the new lighter styles currently emerging in the marketplace, but deep down I like the heavier, old-style Pinotages way more. So with BLANKBOTTLE Saint Rand 2018, I aimed for something in between - not as heavy as the older styles and not as light as the modern versions. Just to clarify; the Pinotage in both B.O.E.T. 2017 and Saint Rand 2018 comes from the same vineyard in Darling." Producer's note

BLANKbottle But Why 2019

R280.00 inc. VAT
"I was concerned that ripening would be a challenge. My initial thoughts were that the wines would be green. What we did not realise at the time was that the site’s radiation levels (sunlight) were off-the-charts high and the average temperature is low during summer. The grapes could therefore stay on the vines much longer, absorbing massive amounts of sunlight, whilst growing in maturity and getting rid of greenness. Resulting in ripe grapes with lower sugar levels. Sandy soils are also famous for producing more elegant wines."- Producer's note

Keermont Cabernet Sauvignon 2017

R280.00 inc. VAT
"2017 was an excellent growing season on Keermont. Despite a drier than usual winter, we had strong growth in the vineyards during the spring time. This led to the formation of a good healthy crop which ripened evenly during the warm, dry summer. Harvest started fairly early, but was put on hold after a heavy rainfall in late January. This rejuvenated the vines and allowed for extended ripening which definitely raised the general quality. We recorded one of our largest and healthiest crops yet and grapes came in with great analysis and concentration." Winemaker's notes.

BLANKbottle Boetie 2020

R280.00 inc. VAT
Picked early, the grapes from the decomposed granitic soil were destemmed and underwent fermentation over 5 days. The wine shows a wonderful fruity crunch on the palate, but with firm tannins giving it some grip. We tasted it and could not believe it was 100% Pinotage.

Paolo Scavino Dolcetto d’Alba 2019

R285.00 inc. VAT
The Paolo Scavino Dolcetto d'Alba is a lean and easy red wine that offers bright primary fruit with plenty of blackberry, black cherry and summer plum. The fruit is presented with naked transparency and bright intensity, making it perfect for a weeknight at home with take-home pizza or cheese flatbread. That dark fruit cedes to earthy tones of clay and crushed stone.

Savage “Follow the Line” 2020

"Now in its eighth vintage, ‘Follow The Line’ continues to be one of South Africa’s most respected old vine Cinsaults. As always, the fruit comes from 40-year-old dry-farmed bush vines in Darling grown on decomposed granite soils. The 2020 is spontaneously fermented with 50% of the fruit as whole clusters. Every vintage that passes boasts an incredibly perfumed floral bouquet of violets, pressed rose petals, and hints of cherry blossom that melt into pronounced notes of earthy lavender, coriander, and Turkish delight. The palate is incredibly cool and suave with bright tingling cherry acids. A silky weightless concentration, crystalline wild strawberry, and red cherry fruits, and the most delicate lacey tannins on the finish. This is a very polished, ethereal, classy effort with so many of the Cinsault characteristics drawing an undeniable resemblance to young, premium Côtes de Beaune Pinot Noir. Approachable on release, but cellar-worthy for at least 10+years, don’t miss this new release." - Greg Sherwood MW

Domaine Philippe Alliet Chinon Tradition 2019

Lovely aromas of blue fruits, plum, violets, and spice. Juicy, textured, and complex on the palate, with a touch of savoriness and crushed rock. Finishes silky with a lingering notes of pepper and black cherry.

BLANKbottle Oppie Koppie 2017

R310.01 inc. VAT
"It immediately triggered an idea: if I ferment the wine without removing the stems (a.k.a. whole bunch fermentation), chances were that I could possibly extract some of that exciting spice. So I chucked 33.33333% of the total volume of grapes into a fermentation vessel (stems and all) and crushed it with my feet. With the balance of the grapes, I removed the stems using a de-stemmer and filled the tank. All the grapes then underwent spontaneous fermentation. After 4 weeks, I pressed the grapes and the wine aged in barrel for a year. When the time came for label design, I did a pencil drawing of an old-fashioned film camera taking a photo of a grape-stem. I blackened the camera lens in such a way that only one third of the stem was exposed to the camera. I then called the wine 33.3333. In 2015, the stems were super ripe and I decided to do 100% whole bunch fermentation. On the label I altered the sketch in order for the camera lens to have a 100% exposure to the stem. 2016, the stems were ripe, but not as ripe as the 2015 vintage, so I went for 70% exposure. When it came to the 2017 vintage I decided that, in order for this wine to get to the next level, it needed more complexity. The only way to gain complexity is to add vineyards with flavour profiles that would enhance and add layers to the original wine. A little bit of Shiraz from the Swartland and a tad Cinsaut from the Breedekloof did the trick. Having had 80% whole cluster fermentation, I initially called the wine 80.0000 (referring to the percentage exposure to stems as in previous years), but this was confusing to my clients. I then changed the name to Oppie-Koppie, the name the farmer calls the vineyard - a 2017 Voor-Paardeberg Shiraz (my 4th vintage from this block of grapes). Northern Rhône-like in style, super spicy with nice grip. Ageing will only do this wine great but you can also drink it now." - Producer Note

BLANKbottle Pseudonym 2020

R310.01 inc. VAT
"There are two farms in Darling who share the same entrance. I buy grapes from Framer 1. He is a really good farmer and many years ago realised that the only way to make his business work is to farm top-quality grapes. He therefore removed all inferior high-production vineyards and was left with only old Bush vines with potential. He then sourced buyers from top wineries - guys and girls who could afford paying much more for his grapes and compensate him for the extra care given to these Old vines. Over the years he therefore created a niche market for himself. His neighbour however (Farmer 2), farms for the big co-operative winery who doesn't pay as well as the smaller wineries. So, each time a branded vehicle entered their shared entrance, Farmer 2 made a note of the name of the winery who buys from his neighbour. He would then get into contact with the winery and try and sell them grapes as well. I don't have any branding on my vehicle though, so he couldn't track me down. One day, however, he phoned Farmer 1 and complained about the speed I was driving, obviously wanting to find out who I was. Farmer 1’s reply? “Oh, you mean the jam(preserve) maker from The Strand? He’s the one who buys all my left-over grapes once I’ve sold all my top stuff. He then pays me double what the others are paying and makes jam in The Strand (my home town).” I’m sure this kept Farmer 2 busy for a while. My pseudonym: “Die konfytkoker van die Strand”, meaning “The jam maker from the Strand”. Pseudonym is made from a small 68-year old little vineyard. It grows in a little valley into the mountain in Darling. Seeing that it is the only food source around, the birds eat the grapes every year. The farmer could never use the valley for something else, so he kept the vineyard. When the grapes eventually ripened, there wouldn’t be much left to harvest. He would then pick the bits and throw it with the other grapes from the farm headed for the big co-operative winery. This was what had happened for 64 years. I asked him if we could cover the whole vineyard with bird nets, I bought the nets and he gave the labour. It was at the age of 65 when, for the first time, a wine was made exclusively from that little vineyard. I make two wines from it. Retirement@65 - a blend of the little block of Cinsaut and 25% Shiraz as well as Pseudonym which is 100% the Old vineyard Cinsaut. "Producer's note

BLANKbottle B.I.G. 2019

R310.01 inc. VAT
"The Swartland Revolution was exactly that: a revolution initiated by Swartland farmers which turned the premium wine market upside down. Suddenly premium higher-priced Bordeaux-style Stellenbosch wines had to share the stage with premium Rhone-style Swartland blends. And so it happened then, that for the past 8 years, the media stuck Cabernet Sauvignon in a dark and dusty corner - not “cool” enough. As some of you might know, at the moment I make wine from 24 varieties. I thought it a bright idea to do something for the neglected, fallen-from-grace Cabernet Sauvignon. I subsequently identified 8 Cabernet Sauvignon vineyards, 2 Cabernet franc and 1 Petit Verdot with vastly different heights above sea level: 7 near Somerset West (at 32 to 391 m), 2 on the outskirts of Tulbagh (both at 310 m) and 2 in the Witzenberg’s Koue Bokkeveld (at 734 and 755m). When I first started speaking to the masters of Cabernet here at the Southernmost tip of Africa, the first thing mentioned by most was the dreaded Greenness in Cabernet Sauvignon - a very unwelcome herbaceous / vegetative character. This develops due to high levels of Pyrazines present in the wine - something that's determined by the ripeness level of the grapes. The longer the grape bunches get exposed to sunlight during the growing period, the less Pyrazines - resulting in less greenness in the end product - reducing herbaceousness and amplifying fruit. Here in South Africa we have a unique situation: although we have plenty of sunshine, it is hot and dry. In most instances, by the time the grapes are ripe for picking, it hasn't had long enough sun exposure for the Pyrazines to get to an acceptable level. And if you leave it on the vine for longer, the sugar level gets too high. These sugars are then transformed during fermentation into alcohol resulting in rather high alcoholic wines. So in general, Cabernet creators are in fact chased by the Green Monster. Defended by some, feared by most. What confuses me, though, is that one could argue that this greenness is a stylistic characteristic of wines closer to the ocean, which makes it acceptable. Or does it? Where the exact point lies where herbaceousness turns into greenness - I am not sure. That’s why I decided to make a Cabernet Sauvignon led blend and identified the following 11 vineyards from different heights above sea levels. The closest vineyard to the ocean is 3km and the furthest 3 hours drive." Producer's note

BLANKbottle The Spaniard 2020

R310.01 inc. VAT
BLANKbottle The Spaniard 2020 is 100% Mourvèdre from a bush vine growing in schist soil in the Riebeek Valley. Just 3 barrels were made (1 x 225L new oak barrel and 2 x 225L older oak barrels). The winemaker, Pieter describes the wine as flirty and very expressive so went with a dumpier bottle shape for 'stage presence' and a loud label design.

Savage Red 2019

R310.01 inc. VAT
Savage Red 2019 "Syrah exclusively sourced in Stellenbosch from vineyards organically grown on decomposed granite soils. Always released a year behind the rest of the Savage range, this 2019 is a dense, dark, potent red from a powerful, concentrated, minerally focused vintage. On the nose, the aromatics are marked by intense notes of earthy red and blackberry fruits, inky saline notes of black cherries, pink musk, savoury cured meat nuances, black olives, and a sappy cedar wood spice complexity. With 70% of whole clusters used in the fermentation, the palate shows pronounced chalky mineral tannins with vibrantly fresh crunchy acids from the granitic soils. Raspberries and blueberries surge to the fore on this dense, powerfully structured wine, gaining in richness and intensity as the wine slowly unfurls in the glass. The wine shows a focused prowess and concentration together with an opulent richness framed by an underlying stony minerality. A wine with undeniable focus and structure but also a surfeit of seductive charm."- Greg Sherwood MW

La Rioja Alta Vina Alberdi 2015

R330.00 inc. VAT
The classic Haro-styled red 2015 Viña Alberdi, sold abroad with the mention of Reserva and in Spain as Crianza, is a good introduction to the house style: balsamic reds with abundant notes of sweet spices and cigar ash, developed aromas of forest floor and a creamy twist making small concessions for a fresher and cleaner profile in the last few years but keeping the classic style. There are notes of ground tobacco and earth, and the palate is seamless and sleek, with polished tannins and a soft mouthfeel. There are 550,000 bottles of this wine, all produced from a single master blend. It was bottled in September 2018 after two years in American oak barrels.