Type / Red Blend

Showing 1–24 of 53 results

Álvaro Palacios Priorat “L’Ermita” 2015 

"Tasting L'Ermita is always an emotional moment, as it's one of the great reds from Spain. The 2015 L'Ermita is 91% Garnacha, 8% Cariñena and 1% split between Garnacha Blanca, Macabeo and PX from the most famous single vineyard in Priorat. It fermented in oak foudre with indigenous yeasts and also had its élevage in foudre, which lasted for 15 months. The juicy freshness of this 2015, citric and vibrant, makes it very different from the rest of the portfolio. This is transparent, precise, like laser cut, chiseled, subtle and elegant, showing very open and expressive, with great freshness and the core of Mediterranean flavors. 2,200 bottles were filled in February 2017. 2015 was a high-yielding vintage in Spain in general and in Priorat in particular. The wines here have little color and feel very ethereal. 2016 is clearly more concentrated, and at the same time, the wines show vibrant acidity and more freshness." - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

BLANKbottle “Retirement @ 65” 2020

R310.01 inc. VAT
"In June 2014, I arrived at a farm in Darling where I was met by a very grumpy farmer. And for good reason I soon learnt. I had bought bits of grapes from the farmer during that year’s harvest (which all turned out really promising) and was doing my annual post-harvest farm visit with a fresh barrel sample for the farmer to taste. One of his grape clients had previously persuaded him to farm a little Cinsaut vineyard by method of minimum intervention. Not in an organic kind of a way, but more towards a 300% leave-the- vineyard-to-be kind of way. To make a long story short, due to many contributing factors, all the grapes of this little Cinsaut vineyard ended up going to the pigs and he was blaming his minimum intervention 300% leave-the-vineyard-to-be client for all of this. To make matters worse, for the 62 years prior to this, the vineyard hardly produced grapes sufficient to produce wine with. You see, his grandfather planted the vineyard in 1951 and had still used a horse to plough the land. The vineyard is on the edge of the mountain in a little valley and the only food source around. So as the berries accumulated sugar, the birds would hop from bunch to bunch pricking the berries with their beaks, causing them to rot. And by the time the grapes ripened there weren’t much left. Now things like this interest me. I asked him if we could give it one more try. He reluctantly agreed on the basis that he farms the block the way he believes one should. I, in turn, agreed to buy bird nets to cover the vines and we had a deal. So mid 2014 the vines were neatly pruned and he took care of the weeds. That spring, after bud break, the first soft green shoots appeared. Everything looked good! Then, one Sunday afternoon, I received a photo on whatsapp. It was the vineyard in question with about 20 odd sheep feeding in the vineyard and no sign of the newly formed soft shoots - only brown stumps remaining as the vineyard celebrated it’s 64th birthday. Late that Friday night his sheep had broken through the fence and ate everything green in colour. So there went another crop and the farmer got even more despondent. But he didn't give up and so, in June 2015, he raised the fence. In early November we covered the whole vineyard in bird nets. Finally, in February 2016 (for the first time in 65 years!) the vineyard survived the onslaught of wild animals roaming the hillsides of Darling and we picked a very small, but healthy, crop." Producer's note

BLANKbottle B-BOS-1 2018

R250.00 inc. VAT
"My grandmother grew up on a farm near a town called Bredasdorp. It’s about 45 minutes drive from L’Agulhas, where the most Southern point of the African continent is situated. When she got married, she received a wedding gift from her parents - a plot of land right next to the ocean in L’Agulhas. She built a small wooden house with the money she received as wedding gifts (seems like the standard of wedding gifts has lowered significantly in the years since then…). It’s 75 years later and the wooden house called “T-nie-C” is now my mom’s and still fully operational as a family holiday house. This is our post-harvest, post-travel, post-bottling family hideaway and very close to our hearts. The place where the kids and Aneen and I reconnect with each other and ourselves, and also where I design most of my labels. Because of this, I’ve always wanted to produce a wine of origin Cape Agulhas. I had my eye on a few possible sites but it was a phone call from Caroline Rillema, owner of Caroline's Fine Wines (a wine shop in Cape Town), that was the start of an epic venture in this area. Caroline is a formidable force in the wine industry and she and her husband Ray, planted two vineyards on their holiday breakaway smallholding in a little town called Baardskeerdersbos. As the crow flies it is 47 km from our little house in L’Agulhas. If you translate Baardskeerdersbos into English, it means “Beard-Shavers-Bush”, named after a famous spider that lives in these parts of the country. This spider builds its nest from human hair… and the myth goes that when you go to bed at night the Baardskeerder spider will climb into your bed and shave your beard for the construction of his home. So I make wine from two different wines on Caroline’s property - B-BOS-1 and B-BOS-2." - Producer Note

BLANKbottle B.I.G. Magnum 2019

R630.00 inc. VAT
"The Swartland Revolution was exactly that: a revolution initiated by Swartland farmers which turned the premium wine market upside down. Suddenly premium higher-priced Bordeaux-style Stellenbosch wines had to share the stage with premium Rhone-style Swartland blends. And so it happened then, that for the past 8 years, the media stuck Cabernet Sauvignon in a dark and dusty corner - not “cool” enough. As some of you might know, at the moment I make wine from 24 varieties. I thought it a bright idea to do something for the neglected, fallen-from-grace Cabernet Sauvignon. I subsequently identified 8 Cabernet Sauvignon vineyards, 2 Cabernet franc and 1 Petit Verdot with vastly different heights above sea level: 7 near Somerset West (at 32 to 391 m), 2 on the outskirts of Tulbagh (both at 310 m) and 2 in the Witzenberg’s Koue Bokkeveld (at 734 and 755m). When I first started speaking to the masters of Cabernet here at the Southernmost tip of Africa, the first thing mentioned by most was the dreaded Greenness in Cabernet Sauvignon - a very unwelcome herbaceous / vegetative character. This develops due to high levels of Pyrazines present in the wine - something that's determined by the ripeness level of the grapes. The longer the grape bunches get exposed to sunlight during the growing period, the less Pyrazines - resulting in less greenness in the end product - reducing herbaceousness and amplifying fruit. Here in South Africa we have a unique situation: although we have plenty of sunshine, it is hot and dry. In most instances, by the time the grapes are ripe for picking, it hasn't had long enough sun exposure for the Pyrazines to get to an acceptable level. And if you leave it on the vine for longer, the sugar level gets too high. These sugars are then transformed during fermentation into alcohol resulting in rather high alcoholic wines. So in general, Cabernet creators are in fact chased by the Green Monster. Defended by some, feared by most. What confuses me, though, is that one could argue that this greenness is a stylistic characteristic of wines closer to the ocean, which makes it acceptable. Or does it? Where the exact point lies where herbaceousness turns into greenness - I am not sure. That’s why I decided to make a Cabernet Sauvignon led blend and identified the following 11 vineyards from different heights above sea levels. The closest vineyard to the ocean is 3km and the furthest 3 hours drive. My eie plaas - Cabernet Sauvignon: Valley floor Firgrove - 32 meters above sea-level. UNITY - Cabernet Sauvignon: Lower slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 116 meters above sea-level. LAN - Cabernet Sauvignon: Firgrove (slope facing towards the Helderberg) - 60m meters above sea-level. COR-CS - Cabernet Sauvignon: Higher slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 308 meters above sea-level. COR-CF - Cabernet franc: Higher slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 320 meters above sea-level. Sigh of Relief - Cabernet franc: Higher slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 391 meters above sea-level. Black Nectar - Petit verdot: Blaauwklippen Road Stellenbosch - 279 meters above sea-level. TOOLBAG Cabernet Sauvignon: Tulbagh - 310 meters above sea-level Mr VILLA Cabernet Sauvignon: Tulbagh - 310 meters above sea-level BUT WHY?: Ceres Plateau - 734 meters above sea-level LEAVING THE TABLE: Ceres Plateau - 755 meters above sea-level We made them all separately and aged them all in French oak for one and a half years - picked mainly when we thought the grapes tasted best. Interestingly enough, the first vineyard on the Helderberg ripened in late February whereas the last vineyard in Ceres Plateau (about 3 hours drive from the first) reached optimum ripeness on 22 April - 100 days into harvest and also the very last grapes to hit the cellar." -Producer’s note

BLANKbottle Empire 2019

R310.01 inc. VAT
"Just for the record - I am a huge fan of Swartland white blends. The image of South African wines has changed dramatically over the past 10 years and the Swartland played a huge part in this. Their wines, especially the Rhône-style white blends are top notch. They are fun, young, energetic and unique and started to gain international fame. Stellenbosch, however (where I studied winemaking), is the original EMPIRE of South African wine. Like most of us, I like to support the underdog, and in the case of white blends, the Empire became exactly that. So I created a white blend based on similar varieties - a combination that could give some of the Swartland white blends a go. The empire is therefore now striking back at the Swartland with a blend of an all-Stellenbosch Verdelho, Pinot blanc, Sauvignon blanc, Roussanne, Marsanne, Chardonnay, Chenin blanc and Viognier. The label consists of two sections. On the left part of the label you will see a half star, which was the logo for the "Swartland Revolution". And on the right - stripes that represent a traditional and conservative EMPIRE. And the red brother of Empire Strikes Back is EMPIRE 2019 - not striking back but just being himself. With Cabernet Sauvignon as driver and bits of Petit Verdot and Cabernet franc to compliment. The old style design label shows a combination crest. I combined the crest of Stellenbosch University and Elsenburg College - The 2 Empires when it comes to wine education - I studied at both..." Winemaker's note

BLANKbottle My eie Stofpad 2017

R325.00 inc. VAT
A blend of Cabernet franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec from the Helderberg Stellenbosch.

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2006 Unico Magnum

I tasted the 2006 Único again, and it's clearly the best Único produced in the last few years, to which I don't find much logic, as on paper 2004 and 2005 were better years in Ribera del Duero. However it is, the 2006 is a fantastic modern Vega Sicilia in the making, powerful and clean, still very young and marked by the élevage with a whiff of American oak and a creamy texture in the palate. It should age very well for a very long time. I'd wait to pull the cork, even if it's drinkable and quite showy already. This is the current vintage in 2018, even if the 2007 and 2008 were released before it and even before the 2005. In 2019 they will release the 2009. 93,993 bottles, 2,552 magnums, 165 double magnums and six imperials were produced.

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2010 Unico

Opaque violet. Intensely perfumed, expansive black and blue fruit preserve, potpourri, Moroccan spice and botanical herb scents are complemented by smoky mineral and vanilla flourishes. Sappy, penetrating and deeply concentrated on the palate, offering vibrant, mineral-laced black currant, bitter cherry, chewing tobacco, mocha and floral pastille flavors that deepen and turn sweeter on the back half. Shows superb focus and vibrant, floral lift on the wonderfully long, youthfully tannic finish, which leaves behind cherry liqueur, candied violet and spicecake notes.

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2015 Valbuena 5˚ 3L

Opaque garnet. Vibrant, finely detailed cherry liqueur, dark berry, exotic spice and floral qualities on the expressive nose, along with hints of mocha and incense. Stains the palate with sweet, penetrating red and dark fruit, violet pastille, chewing tobacco and spicecake flavors that pick up a vanilla flourish on the back half. Smoothly blends power and finesse and finishes on a youthfully tannic note, showing outstanding clarity and mineral-tinged persistence.

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2015 Valbuena 5˚ Magnum

Opaque garnet. Vibrant, finely detailed cherry liqueur, dark berry, exotic spice and floral qualities on the expressive nose, along with hints of mocha and incense. Stains the palate with sweet, penetrating red and dark fruit, violet pastille, chewing tobacco and spicecake flavors that pick up a vanilla flourish on the back half. Smoothly blends power and finesse and finishes on a youthfully tannic note, showing outstanding clarity and mineral-tinged persistence.

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2015 Valbuena 5˚xxx

Opaque garnet. Vibrant, finely detailed cherry liqueur, dark berry, exotic spice, and floral qualities on the expressive nose, along with hints of mocha and incense. Stains the palate with sweet, penetrating red and dark fruit, violet pastille, chewing tobacco and spice cake flavors that pick up a vanilla flourish on the back half. Smoothly blends power and finesse and finishes on a youthfully tannic note, showing outstanding clarity and mineral-tinged persistence.

Château Fourcas-Borie Listrac-Médoc Cru Bourgeois Supérieurs 2015

R494.99 inc. VAT
Made by the same winemaking team as the top estate of Château Ducru-Beaucaillou in Saint-Julien, this wine comes from a long-time Borie family estate. The wine, with its layers of rich blackberry fruits and firm, dusty tannins, is concentrated, dark and certain to age well. Drink from 2025. - Wine Enthusiast

Château Latour Grand Vin 2001

R12,995.00 inc. VAT
"The 2001 Latour is magnificent. A huge, structured wine, the 2001 Latour boasts notable depth to match its vertical, towering structure and pure power. At nearly fifteen years of age, the 2001 remains deep, virile and imposing. With air, the 2001 is a approachable now, but ideally it needs at least a few more years in bottle. This is a superb showing by any measure. Frédéric Engerer adds that 2001 was the last vintage that was lightly filtered prior to bottling."- Antonio Galloni, Vinous

Château Margaux Grand Vin Premier Grand Cru Classé 2004

R9,995.00 inc. VAT
"The 2004 Chateau Margaux has always been a promising wine and here, served blind against the First Growths, it finally proved that patience is necessary when it comes to such wines. It has an exquisite bouquet with brilliant delineation, scents of redcurrant, raspberry coulis, cold stone (almost flint-like) with pencil-lead and cedar lending it a Pauillac-like sense of aristocratic flair. The palate is extremely well balanced with a supple opening, nigh perfect acidity with a surprisingly citric undercurrent that lends so much freshness and tension. While it does not have the weight and power of say, 2000, 2005 or 2009, it cruises along with utmost harmony and you become smitten by its charms - something that is perhaps in short supply among the First Growths in this vintage. This is excellent. " Neal Martin, Wine Advocate

Château Tertre Rôteboeuf Saint-Emilion Grand Cru 2007 Magnum

R8,795.00 inc. VAT
"Tasted blind at Farr Vintners 2007 Bordeaux tasting. The 2007 Le Tertre-Rôteboeuf has an irresistible bouquet with plush red and black fruit, crème de cassis and vanilla pod, almost Burgundian in style and billowing with aeration in the glass. The palate is medium-bodied and plush with dark plum, macerated red cherries and strawberry. But this is all about that velvety texture and the weight and concentration on the finish. Surely this is Tertre-Rôteboeuf? It is! Perhaps the most delicious wine of the vintage." - Neal Martin, Wine Advocate

Château Tertre Rôteboeuf Saint-Emilion Grand Cru 2009

R7,995.00 inc. VAT
"Dark ruby-red. Ripe red cherry, raspberry liqueur, coffee and underbrush on the concentrated nose. Then rich, dense and suave on the palate, with a chocolatey ripeness to the red and dark fruit flavors. Finishes very long, with enticing juiciness and smooth tannins. This very rich, sweet Tertre-Roteboeuf is in the process of shutting down and actually offers less of the exuberantly rich sweet fruit it showed during the Primeurs, but it has the stuffing and backbone for a glorious mid-term life in bottle."

Danie Junior Red Blend 2018

R110.01 inc. VAT
Interesting herbaceous profile, showing earthy, crushed leaf components and even agave, but without any green, bitter elements. The palate is broad, with red fruited accessibility, and the property’s signature structure and firm tannins. Medium bodied.

Domaine du Pélican Trois Cepages 2017

R500.01 inc. VAT
"A few years ago Guillaume d’Angerville began expanding from Volnay with the acquisition of vineyards in Jura. Since then, he has added to his holdings. The 2017 Arbois Trois Cépages is a pretty blend of Pinot Noir, Trousseau and Poulsard. Bright floral notes and red berry fruit are nicely lifted in an attractive, gracious light-bodied wine that is easy to drink now. I suppose a juicier red like a Dolcetto, Barbera, Aglianico or even Chianti Classico would have technically been a better match for this food, but the wine was delicious just the same." - Antonio Galloni, Vinous.com

Domaine Juliette Avril Châteauneuf-du-Pape 2017

R485.00 inc. VAT
Avril's cuvée tradition, the 2017 Chateauneuf du Pape, is a blend of 65% Grenache, 25% Syrah and 10% Mourvèdre, aged in a combination of foudres and cement tanks. Some herbal notes accent raspberries and stone fruit in this full-bodied wine, which is silky enough, with a peppery finish. It's well made and harmonious, if not particularly intense or long." - Joe Czerwinski, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

Domaine Marquis d’Angerville Bourgogne Passetoutgrains 2018

"Passetoutgrain is, as its name suggests, a blend of two grape varieties: Gamay and Pinot Noir, which generally represent around a third of the total. The composition of our Bourgogne Passetoutgrain is rather evenly distributed between the two grape varieties. It is a “simple” wine, unpretentious, but elaborated with care, and which is always easily approachable. It is a typically Burgundian appellation that we are keen to promote." Winemaker's notes

Domaine Michel Lafarge Bourgogne “Passe-tout-grains l’Exception” 2017

"A pepper and earth-inflected nose is composed by notes of both red and dark berry fruit aromas. The delicious and well-detailed middle weight flavors possess a lovely sense of purity along with excellent depth and persistence for what this is. In sum, this offers outstanding quality for the genre, indeed I've rarely seen better." - Allen Meadows, Burghound