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Steytler 1947 Chenin Blanc 2021

"From 74 year old vines, the aromatics are super complex and spicy with lovely nuances of wet straw, dusty white citrus, honied yellow peaches, fynbos and sweet pineapple confit. There is such focused depth, full bodied plump texture and complexity with fabulous nuances of tangerine peel, naartjie pulp, lychee concentrate and a honied bon bon intensity. A super impressive wine with power, breadth and weight but a balancing harmonious acidity. The true personification of delicious old vine Chenin Blanc statesmanship. World class from every angle. Drink now and over the next 25 years" – Greg Sherwood MW

Steytler Vision 2020

R630.00 inc. VAT
Steytler Vision 2020, "Power & concentration, within a tightly woven structure showing lots of promise. Generous cassis and blackberries as well as vanilla and spice from the oak. Complex & multi-dimensional. Those who can resist the temptation will be rewarded well with cellaring." Winemaker's notes

Steytler Pentagon 2020

R630.00 inc. VAT
"Kaapzicht Steytler Pentagon 2020, A muscular Bordeaux style blend that exudes power and concentration, tied up in a structure of fine grained tannin and bright acidity that not only promise extensive evolution, but also entices with every visit to the glass. Brooding dark fruit tightly packed in an intricate frame are delivered with great purity and finesse."- Winemaker's notes

Steytler Pinotage 2020

R630.00 inc. VAT
Steytler Pinotage 2020, "Patriotism is a personal conviction. “Steytler Pinotage” is our patriotic devotion to the trials and tribulations of mastering Pinotage since its earliest beginnings right here in the Bottelary Hills. As this is South Africa’s only truly original grape, we are fixated on flaunting its finesse to the world. With this wine we pay homage to George Steytler who farmed Kaapzicht for 33 years" - Winemaker's notes

François Cotat Sancerre Les Culs de Beaujeu 2019

R750.00 inc. VAT
Cuvée Cul de Beaujeu is a grand terroir of Sancerre, a cru on Kimméridgian marl. When tasting, it stands out for its smoky and mineral aromas and exotic fruit. Full and round, on the palate the mineral and exotic fruit flavours abound. Highly elegant, it has good ageing potential.

François Cotat Sancerre Les Caillottes 2019

R550.00 inc. VAT
This comes from parcels around the village of Chavignol, on the chalky limestone soils. It is the most approachable and early drinking of the Cotat range, but even this will improve over many years. It is juicy and long, concentrated but weightless.

Domaine du Pelican Arbois Poulsard 2018

R550.00 inc. VAT
"I like the purity and profile of the 2018 Arbois Poulsard, which, like the sample I tasted before, is quite expressive and agreeable, bright and lively, aromatic and open, quite elegant, with some tannins. It's not as funky as many examples of the grape can be. They picked a little early, and the wine is somewhat herbaceous (in a positive way) and only 11.5% alcohol." - Luis Gutiérrez, The Wine Advocate

Domaine du Pélican Arbois Trois Cépages 2018

R525.00 inc. VAT
"The 2018 Arbois Trois Cepages a is brilliant introduction to Guillaume D’Angerville’s Jura reds. Bright and punchy, the Trois Cepages offers superb fruit intensity in the mid-weight, lifted style that is typical of these wines. The warm growing season gives this blend of Pinot Noir, Trousseau and Poulsard an extra kick of radiance that works so well." - Antonio Galloni, Vinous

Luciano Sandrone Barbera d’Alba 2019

R395.00 inc. VAT
"The 2019 Barbera d'Alba is pure seduction. Silky and plush, with lovely red berry fruit, spice and floral notes, the Barbera is wonderfully expressive today. Here, too, readers will find a much more restrained style than in the past." - Antonio Galloni, Vinous

Luciano Sandrone “Valmaggiore” Nebbiolo d’Alba 2019

R494.99 inc. VAT
"The Luciano Sandrone 2019 Nebbiolo d'Alba Valmaggiore is a beautiful expression of this mighty red grape from the north of Italy. The Valmaggiore vineyard in Roero offers a spicy and accessible interpretation with plenty of wild cherry and blue flower. This vintage also offers pretty layer of crushed white peppercorn. You get terrific complexity and a very food-friendly ensemble at a competitive price." - Monica Larner, The Wine Advocate

BLANKbottle Nothing to Declare 2021

R280.00 inc. VAT
They used various techniques, one of them being… tie it to your leg, drop your pants to cover it and walk through the NOTHING TO DECLARE section at the airport as if you have… NOTHING TO DECLARE - you know the feeling...Back in SA they would then reproduce and plant little vineyards, do trials on them and plant larger ones (to state the obvious: this was completely illegal, distributing diseases being the main risk). I, however, have seen first-hand that the type of farmer who went through all the effort to do this, is almost without fail completely passionate, super psyched-up, forward-thinking farmers/winemakers - serious producers. So they would, without a doubt, bring in clean, great quality vines.Nothing to Declare is a tribute to these vine smugglers. Providing us, the new generation winemakers, the foundation to take this industry to new heights.In 2012 and 2013 I made a wine that was driven by one of these illegally smuggled grape varieties. It was registered with the government as Chenin Blanc. I called it “Nothing to declare”. Since then this particular vineyard went through a process of amnesty and was now declared legal. So this wine grew from there, using that vineyard as a base and combining that with as many of the not so traditional South African varietals I have in the Winery.The Label: I did a chalk drawing on the one side of one of the barrels - an image of vine cuttings tied to a man’s leg, about to be covered by his pants. After a few months, the image faded. To solidify the image, I engraved it into the wood like it was done in the olden days. So in February 2015, after bottling the first vintage, I needed a label. I bought printing ink and applied it to the surface of the carved image. I then placed a large piece of paper on it and made a print, which became the main image for the label. - Winemaker's Note

BLANKbottle 1 Click off 2021

R365.00 inc. VAT
"I started with a clear vision for this wine - only to miss it completely… hence the original name of the wine: 2-CLICKS-OFF. The ‘13 and ‘14 vintages came and went - either down the drain or to a blend. The vineyard then changed ownership and I was out. Lost the vineyard. It happens from time to time. I’m a firm believer in letting things takes its natural course but this time round it was different. I had the conviction that the vineyard was mine to make wine of. It just needed to mature a bit. So I decided to fight for it. Like back in the day when my now wife dated one of my friends…I didn’t give up and in harvest 2016 I received the long-awaited phone call: do I still want the Pinot? Being so late in the season, the grapes were over-ripe and the vineyard was in a neglected state. But I knew that it was my chance to get my foot back in the door.After harvest, when the dust had settled, we sat down and had a chat. I immediately sensed a change of heart. André van Wyk, the now fully-committed sole owner, had a vision but wasn't sure how to go about it. He was also aiming for a classic Pinot. So I took my cue from George Clooney in the OCEAN-8 movie: I needed a team. I approached a guy called Jaco Engelbrecht of Visual Viticulture - an intensely articulated and passionate guy. I introduced Jaco and Andre and immediately there was the proverbial magic in the air. The game was on!" - Winemaker's notes

BLANKbottle B.I.G. 2020

R310.01 inc. VAT
"The Swartland Revolution was exactly that: a revolution initiated by Swartland farmers which turned the premium wine market upside down. Suddenly premium higher-priced Bordeaux-style Stellenbosch wines had to share the stage with premium Rhone-style Swartland blends. And so it happened then, that for the past 8 years, the media stuck Cabernet Sauvignon in a dark and dusty corner - not “cool” enough. As some of you might know, at the moment I make wine from 30 varieties. I thought it a bright idea to do something for the neglected, fallen-from-grace Cabernet Sauvignon. I subsequently identified vineyards with vastly different heights above sea level: 7 near Somerset West (at 32 to 391 m), 2 on the outskirts of Tulbagh (both at 310 m) and 2 in the Witzenberg’s Koue Bokkeveld (at 734 and 755m).When I first started speaking to the masters of Cabernet here at the Southernmost tip of Africa, the first thing mentioned by most was the dreaded Greenness in Cabernet Sauvignon - a very unwelcome herbaceous / vegetative character. This develops due to high levels of Pyrazines present in the wine - something that's determined by the ripeness level of the grapes. The longer the grape bunches get exposed to sunlight during the growing period, the less Pyrazines - resulting in less greenness in the end product - reducing herbaceousness and amplifying fruit. Here in South Africa we have a unique situation: although we have plenty of sunshine, it is hot and dry. In most instances, by the time the grapes are ripe for picking, it hasn't had long enough sun exposure for the Pyrazines to get to an acceptable level. And if you leave it on the vine for longer, the sugar level gets too high. These sugars are then transformed during fermentation into alcohol resulting in rather high alcoholic wines.So in general, Cabernet creators are in fact chased by the Green Monster. Defended by some, feared by most. What confuses me, though, is that one could argue that this greenness is a stylistic characteristic of wines closer to the ocean, which makes it acceptable. Or does it? Where the exact point lies where herbaceousness turns into greenness - I am not sure. That’s why I decided to make a Cabernet Sauvignon led blend and identified 9 vineyards from different heights above sea levels. The closest vineyard to the ocean is 3km and the furthest 3 hours drive. We made them all separately and aged them all in French oak for one and a half years - picked mainly when we thought the grapes tasted best. Interestingly enough, the first vineyard on the Helderberg ripened in late February whereas the last vineyard in Ceres Plateau (about 3 hours drive from the first) reached optimum ripeness on 22 April - 100 days into harvest and also the very last grapes to hit the cellar." - Winemaker's notes

BLANKbottle Empire 2020

R310.01 inc. VAT
"Just for the record - I am a huge fan of Swartland white blends. The image of South African wines has changed dramatically over the past 10 years and the Swartland played a huge part in this. Their wines, especially the Rhône-style white blends are top notch. They are fun, young, energetic and unique and started to gain international fame.Stellenbosch, however (where I studied winemaking), is the original EMPIRE of South African wine. Like most of us, I like to support the underdog, and in the case of white blends, the Empire became exactly that. So I created a white blend based on similar varieties - a combination that could give some of the Swartland white blends a go. The empire is therefore now striking back at the Swartland with a blend of an all-Stellenbosch Verdelho, Pinot blanc, Sauvignon blanc, Roussanne, Marsanne, Chardonnay, Chenin blanc and Viognier. The label consists of two sections. On the left part of the label you will see a half star, which was the logo for the ""Swartland Revolution"". And on the right - stripes that represent a traditional and conservative EMPIRE. And the red brother of Empire Strikes Back is EMPIRE 2018 - not striking back but just being himself. With Cabernet Sauvignon as driver and bits of Petit Verdot and Cabernet franc to compliment. The old style design label shows a combination crest. I combined the crest of Stellenbosch University and Elsenburg College - The 2 Empires when it comes to wine education - I studied at both..." - Winemaker's notes

BLANKbottle Hinterhofkabuff 2021

R375.00 inc. VAT
"Some of my German clients think that the "branding" of "IM HINTERHOFKABUFF" was neatly thought through, specially and specifically designed to enter and crack the German wine market for BLANKbottle. And yes, the fact that I called the wine a dialect/regional/nickname sort of German name does make the wine sell in Germany. But the truth is that I cannot take credit for it at all, I am just not all that strategical. The truth is: it fell in my lap.Early in 2010, a journalist writing for a huge German magazine called the "Stern" phoned me. He was writing an article on South African wineries to visit, aiming it at touring soccer world cup fans. At the time and still today my office is located next to my winery in a very old dilapidated barn type of building. When I moved in I transferred the run-down barn into a personal office/lounge with a nice Friday braai facility at the back. No flags, no signage, no fountains - just a run-down building with skew walls and heaps of soul.I told that very persistent German journalist that he could not meet me at the office, that we should rather try a coffee shop. It's much nicer. As you know, some people don't take no for an answer, and he was one of them. So he came out to the farm, loved all of it and spent almost 3 hours with me tasting wine and taking pictures.Three months later my sister-in-law living in Switzerland phoned me to say that there was a massive article on South African wineries in the Stern and that BLANKbottle featured. So she emailed me the article and with the help of family, I started to decipher the article. This guy kept on using the word HINTERHOFKABUFF whenever he referred to my office. So I looked it up. In old Berlin, Germany, a typical residential property would have the main house where the owner lived, and then had a sort of second house at the back called the HINTERHOF where a second family would live. And at the back of the HINTERHOF, they usually had a KABUFF. Which was a little garden sort of shack-house for the very poor people to live in. So the direct translation of HINTERHOFKABUFF - BACKYARDSHACK...I took an immediate liking to the name and my mom made a sign for my office. "The Hinterhofkabuff". So when I made my first Weisser Riesling, a varietal that originated in the Rhine Valley Germany - it was logical to find a proper German name for it. Hence: Im Hinterhofkabuff!" - Winemaker's notes

Champagne Marguet Père et Fils Shaman Grand Cru 2017

R750.00 inc. VAT
"Scents of pear, waxy citrus rind, mandarin orange, peach and buttery pastry, Marguet's NV Shaman 17 is medium to full-bodied, pillowy and vinous, with bright acids and chalky grip. It was disgorged in September 2020. As readers will remember, the "17" denotes the base vintage, which is complemented by reserve wines from a solera established in 2010." - William Kelley, The Wine Advocate

Fèlsina – 6 Bottle Mixed Case

R2,470.00 inc. VAT
The Fèlsina 6 – Bottle Mixed Case includes:4 x Fèlsina Berardenga Chianti Classico 2019 2 x Fèlsina Berardenga Chianti Classico Riserva 2017

Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Village 2020

R494.99 inc. VAT
Domaine William Fèvre Chablis Village 2020, "An expressive and airy nose reflects notes of mineral reduction, green fruit and plenty of citrus influence. There is slightly better density and a more attractive texture to the delicious flavors that flash good minerality on the dry, balanced and moderately firm finish. This is worth a look for its level." - Allen Meadow's, Burghound