OUR Gifting / Magnum Selection

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BLANKbottle B.I.G. Magnum 2019

R630.00 inc. VAT
"The Swartland Revolution was exactly that: a revolution initiated by Swartland farmers which turned the premium wine market upside down. Suddenly premium higher-priced Bordeaux-style Stellenbosch wines had to share the stage with premium Rhone-style Swartland blends. And so it happened then, that for the past 8 years, the media stuck Cabernet Sauvignon in a dark and dusty corner - not “cool” enough. As some of you might know, at the moment I make wine from 24 varieties. I thought it a bright idea to do something for the neglected, fallen-from-grace Cabernet Sauvignon. I subsequently identified 8 Cabernet Sauvignon vineyards, 2 Cabernet franc and 1 Petit Verdot with vastly different heights above sea level: 7 near Somerset West (at 32 to 391 m), 2 on the outskirts of Tulbagh (both at 310 m) and 2 in the Witzenberg’s Koue Bokkeveld (at 734 and 755m). When I first started speaking to the masters of Cabernet here at the Southernmost tip of Africa, the first thing mentioned by most was the dreaded Greenness in Cabernet Sauvignon - a very unwelcome herbaceous / vegetative character. This develops due to high levels of Pyrazines present in the wine - something that's determined by the ripeness level of the grapes. The longer the grape bunches get exposed to sunlight during the growing period, the less Pyrazines - resulting in less greenness in the end product - reducing herbaceousness and amplifying fruit. Here in South Africa we have a unique situation: although we have plenty of sunshine, it is hot and dry. In most instances, by the time the grapes are ripe for picking, it hasn't had long enough sun exposure for the Pyrazines to get to an acceptable level. And if you leave it on the vine for longer, the sugar level gets too high. These sugars are then transformed during fermentation into alcohol resulting in rather high alcoholic wines. So in general, Cabernet creators are in fact chased by the Green Monster. Defended by some, feared by most. What confuses me, though, is that one could argue that this greenness is a stylistic characteristic of wines closer to the ocean, which makes it acceptable. Or does it? Where the exact point lies where herbaceousness turns into greenness - I am not sure. That’s why I decided to make a Cabernet Sauvignon led blend and identified the following 11 vineyards from different heights above sea levels. The closest vineyard to the ocean is 3km and the furthest 3 hours drive. My eie plaas - Cabernet Sauvignon: Valley floor Firgrove - 32 meters above sea-level. UNITY - Cabernet Sauvignon: Lower slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 116 meters above sea-level. LAN - Cabernet Sauvignon: Firgrove (slope facing towards the Helderberg) - 60m meters above sea-level. COR-CS - Cabernet Sauvignon: Higher slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 308 meters above sea-level. COR-CF - Cabernet franc: Higher slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 320 meters above sea-level. Sigh of Relief - Cabernet franc: Higher slopes of the Helderberg Somerset West - 391 meters above sea-level. Black Nectar - Petit verdot: Blaauwklippen Road Stellenbosch - 279 meters above sea-level. TOOLBAG Cabernet Sauvignon: Tulbagh - 310 meters above sea-level Mr VILLA Cabernet Sauvignon: Tulbagh - 310 meters above sea-level BUT WHY?: Ceres Plateau - 734 meters above sea-level LEAVING THE TABLE: Ceres Plateau - 755 meters above sea-level We made them all separately and aged them all in French oak for one and a half years - picked mainly when we thought the grapes tasted best. Interestingly enough, the first vineyard on the Helderberg ripened in late February whereas the last vineyard in Ceres Plateau (about 3 hours drive from the first) reached optimum ripeness on 22 April - 100 days into harvest and also the very last grapes to hit the cellar." -Producer’s note

BLANKbottle Little William 2020 Magnum

R630.00 inc. VAT
“The wine is named after my chance meeting with a little boy called William on the Witzenberg mountains. It’s been a fascinating story from the start, but became even more bizarre at the end of last year, with another chance meeting. Little William reloaded! In January 2016, I was driving back from a tiny little vineyard in the Koue Bokkeveld (Ceres Plateau). Cruising along at the 100km/h speed limit, I came to a very winding stretch of road leading towards the Witzenberg pass. Suddenly, for a split second, I thought I saw something in the middle of the road. I had just come through a super sharp bend and had to jump on the brakes with both feet. When I finally got my 470 000-km-on-the-clock Toyota to stop, there, on the white line in the middle of the road, stood a little blonde boy. I guessed him around a year and a half old. He was in his nappies and had a white T-shirt on, perfectly camouflaged on the white line. Unsure of what to do once I’d taken him out of the road, I thought it a good plan to prompt him and see which direction he takes off in (with myself of course right behind). About 200 meters further along the road he (we) crossed a little bridge heading towards the other side of the canal. He turned up a dirt road which led to a farmhouse about 300 meters up a hill. Keeping up to his snail-like pace, we arrived at the house more or less 10 minutes later (in my experience with farm dogs, it wouldn’t have been wise to carry him). When the gardener saw us approaching, he called out to a woman at the house and judging by her reaction, she must’ve been his mom and he must’ve been missing for a while. It was a bit of an emotional and chaotic environment so, knowing he was safe, I just turned around and left without introducing myself. So each time I present a tasting with Little William wine as part of the line-up, I get the same question: “Why is it called, Little William?”, followed almost without fail by: “What does the family have to say about you calling a wine, Little William?” My answer is always the same: “I never went back, they don’t even know the wine exists. But I am convinced there will be this one day where I’d be sitting at some local bar in Knysna, drinking a beer all by myself when the young guy next to me turns to me and introduces himself as William from Ceres.” And I’ll be able to tell him: “Eendag, lank, lank gelede het hierdie oom jou lewe gered!” For 4 years I had the privilege of telling the story of little William. Until last year. When Chapter 2 happened. In November, we took our youngest son for a minor operation at Panorama Mediclinic, Tygerberg, Cape Town. The lady at reception looked at us with a puzzled look on her face. We later learnt that there had been a mistake on the paperwork and they were under the impression that he was an adult. They had subsequently booked him into an adult ward. The man next to him had drunk a cup of coffee at 6:00am that morning with milk in. His operation therefore had to be postponed and he obviously missed his theatre time slot. He had to wait almost the whole day for the next slot. He and Sebastian eventually left for the theatre at more or less the same time. I went to get us a cup of coffee, and as she always does, Aneen started making conversation with the milk-in-the-coffee guy’s wife. On my return Aneen said: ”They are from Ceres, tell her the little William story.” I cringed, thinking: “Why would I do that??” I tried to let her comment slide and filled the awkward silence with useless words. We carried on with the small talk and she ended up telling us that she is a vet and her husband is a farmer. “Where do you farm in Ceres?”, I asked. “In the Witzenberg mountains, on a farm called Blah-blah-blah”, she answered. And, as you’ve probably guessed by now, that was the name of the farm where I dropped little William that morning. It started dawning on me that it might be my Knysna-bar-thing moment happening in a totally bizarre, different way. “Do you have a son called William?” I asked. “No”, she replied, “but my nephew is called William and they live on the same farm, in the house next to the road.” We did the sums and he would’ve been exactly 1 and a half years at the time. So it turns out it wasn’t a beer-in-hand pub in Knysna, but a coffee-in-hand hospital in Cape Town. I should’ve listened to Aneen right from the start… so I told her the whole story and she phoned her sister-in-law. “Did you ever lose William on the farm?” she asked (I don’t think that’s the type of story you volunteer to tell your extended family if not prompted). “Yes”, she said. “There was this one day…” PS: This incident made me think about everyone’s life stories. I’m convinced that these kind of things happen to everyone. The difference is that I just happened to call a wine Little William, and I have a reason to re-tell this story. If I didn’t, I would’ve possibly only re-told the story once or twice, but I can imagine how the finer details could’ve gotten lost between profit margins and VAT. I have a responsibility to convey the story in an honest and factual way. You know how easily a story gets blurry. So each time I drive the road, I recheck my facts: Where exactly did William stand? Distances? The name of the farm? The story then became part of our story. And that day when the lady mentioned Ceres, the first thing Aneen thought about was the boy in the road.” Winemaker’s notes

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2006 Unico Magnum

I tasted the 2006 Único again, and it's clearly the best Único produced in the last few years, to which I don't find much logic, as on paper 2004 and 2005 were better years in Ribera del Duero. However it is, the 2006 is a fantastic modern Vega Sicilia in the making, powerful and clean, still very young and marked by the élevage with a whiff of American oak and a creamy texture in the palate. It should age very well for a very long time. I'd wait to pull the cork, even if it's drinkable and quite showy already. This is the current vintage in 2018, even if the 2007 and 2008 were released before it and even before the 2005. In 2019 they will release the 2009. 93,993 bottles, 2,552 magnums, 165 double magnums and six imperials were produced.

Bodegas Vega Sicilia 2015 Valbuena 5˚ Magnum

Opaque garnet. Vibrant, finely detailed cherry liqueur, dark berry, exotic spice and floral qualities on the expressive nose, along with hints of mocha and incense. Stains the palate with sweet, penetrating red and dark fruit, violet pastille, chewing tobacco and spicecake flavors that pick up a vanilla flourish on the back half. Smoothly blends power and finesse and finishes on a youthfully tannic note, showing outstanding clarity and mineral-tinged persistence.

Bodegas y Viñedos Alion 2016 Tinto Magnum

R2,950.00 inc. VAT
Glass-staining violet. Heady smoke- and mineral-accented aromas of ripe black and blue fruits, incense and potpourri, plus hints of vanilla and cola in the background. Densely packed, alluringly sweet and focused on the palate, offering intense black currant, cherry-vanilla and candied licorice flavors and a touch of exotic spices. Sappy, smooth and seamless in texture, finishing with powerful thrust and velvety tannins that come in late to add shape and gentle grip. 95% French and 5% American oak, 80% of it new.

Champagne Lanson “Gold Label” Brut Vintage 2008 Magnum

R2,510.00 inc. VAT
"In all probability the finest rendition of this cuvée since 1996, Lanson's 2008 Brut Vintage Gold Label is an impressive wine in the making, unwinding in the glass with aromas of white flowers, lemon oil, orange rind, apple and freshly baked sourdough. On the palate, the wine is medium to full-bodied, racy and incisive, with a concentrated but tight-knit profile that exemplifies the house's non-malo style, concluding with a long and penetrating finish. It's a terrific value in the world of seriously age-worthy Champagne." - William Kelley, Wine Advocate

Champagne Lanson “Gold Label” Brut Vintage Magnum 2005

R2,200.00 inc. VAT
"Yellow-golden in color, the 2005 Gold Label Vintage Brut has a deep, ripe and vinous nose. Rich, ripe and full on the palate, with finesse, elegance and a good, pretty long finish, this is a complex cuvée that is built more on maturity than freshness this year." - Stephan Reinhardt, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

Champagne Lanson “Black Label” Brut Non-Vintage Mathusalem (6l)

R6,995.00 inc. VAT
"“Light gold. Aromas of nectarine, pear and lemon curd, with subtle ginger, lees and floral accents. Sappy orchard and citrus fruit flavors are given spine by tangy acidity and pick up spiciness and a chalky nuance with air. Powerful yet lithe and focused, finishing with very good clarity and length and lingering spiciness.” – Josh Raynolds, Antonio Galloni’s Vinous

Champagne Lanson “Clos Lanson” Blanc de Blancs Brut 2006 Magnum

R6,560.00 inc. VAT
"From the immured one-hectare vineyard on the top of the hill, which also harbors the cellar of Champagne Lanson that dates back into the 18th century, the 2006 Clos Lanson is 100% first press Chardonnay from a very fine, chalky soil. It was fermented and aged in Argonne oak until spring 2007 (no malolactic fermentation), and disgorged after seven and a half years on the lees in December 2014 as Brut Nature with a dosage of three grams per liter. This bright yellow-golden colored prestige Champagne offers a brilliant nose of pure and ripe Chardonnay, along with delicate chalky flavors. Full and round on the palate, with a nice freshness and purity, this is a very elegant and well-balanced Blanc de Blancs. it has an aromatic as well as clear, fresh and mineral finish. This very first release has a very good length and characteristic mineral taste, with iodine notes along with ripe fruit and vanilla brioche flavors in the finish. This is a great new entry in the Lanson portfolio and it will improve with age" - Stephan Reinhardt, Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

Champagne Lanson Black Label Brut Non-Vintage 3L

R3,510.01 inc. VAT
"Light gold. Aromas of nectarine, pear and lemon curd, with subtle ginger, lees and floral accents. Sappy orchard and citrus fruit flavors are given spine by tangy acidity and pick-up spiciness and a chalky nuance with air. Powerful yet lithe and focused, finishing with very good clarity and length and lingering spiciness."- Josh Raynolds, Vinous

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1976 Magnum

R12,995.00 inc. VAT
Tasted from magnum, Lanson's 1976 Brut Vintage Collection is spectacular, mingling aromas of white currant, lemon and confit citrus with nuances of brioche, beeswax and dried white flowers. Full-bodied, layered and seamless, it's deep and complete, with huge energy and concentration and a long, saline finish. The product of a dry, warm growing season and an early harvest, the 1976 blend contains an atypically high percentage of Chardonnay.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1979 Magnum

R11,994.99 inc. VAT
A deep copper golden colour. On the nose, initial impacts of spicy and candied fruits. The palate is an abundance of fruit and deep candied flavours, the length on the mid palate is good with complexity throughout until the finish.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1983 Magnum

R9,995.00 inc. VAT
A straw yellow colour with dried fig and apricot aromas. Toasted almonds and biscuits on the palate with a powerful vivacity, hints of citrus and peaches throughout.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1985 Magnum

R8,995.00 inc. VAT
"Tasted from magnum, Lanson's 1985 Brut Vintage Collection is showing brilliantly, revealing a complex bouquet of dried fruit, mandarin orange, toasted bread, honeycomb and musky peach, followed by a full-bodied, deep and intensely concentrated palate that's layered and multidimensional, built around the house's trademark spine of incisive acidity that tempers the inherent generosity of the vintage. Long and penetrating, it concludes with a delicately exotic finish." - William Kelley, Wine Advocate

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1988 Magnum

R8,950.00 inc. VAT
No malolactic fermentation means plenty of fresh acidity and makes this brut nearly as fresh as the day it was born. Enjoy with grilled fish tonight or cellar it for a while. This one will age gracefully for many years to come.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1989 Magnum

R8,500.00 inc. VAT
Tasted from magnum, the 1989 Brut Vintage Collection from Lanson exhibits aromas of toasted nuts and dried fruits as well as hints of confit citrus and mocha. Broad, muscular and powerful, this is a deep and textural Champagne built around considerable dry extract and mid-palate weight as well as the usual racy spine of acidity.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1990 Magnum

R7,695.00 inc. VAT
Nice glowing golden colour. Quite nettly and herbaceous at first, the nose reveals lots of crisp citrus fruit and over-ripe pear, but then a little toasty, biscuity richness shows through. Very full mousse, the palate is densely packed with crisp apple and pear fruit but shot through with racy acidity. Good length, very persistent mousse.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1995 Magnum

R5,300.01 inc. VAT
Musky aromas of nuts and minerals, along with hints of mushroom, earth and smoke. Rather aggressive and raw in the mouth, with slightly crude citrus and stone flavors of decent intensity.

Champagne Lanson Gold Label Brut Vintage 1998 Magnum

R4,749.99 inc. VAT
A straw-yellow colour, slightly amber. On the nose, aromas of dried fig, apricot and pear, mixed with overtones of biscuit. In the mouth, a delicate impact, great fullness and a satisfying, lively finish.

Champagne Vilmart & Cie “Grand Cellier” Premier Cru Brut Magnum Non-Vintage

R1,860.36 inc. VAT
"The NV Brut Cuvee Grand Cellier possesses gorgeous intensity in its piercing notes of lemon, white flowers and spices. Smoky, floral notes continue to emerge as the wine shows off its class and sheer energy. This is a great showing from the Grand Cellier. The Grand Cellier is 70% Chardonnay and 30% Pinot Noir. This release is based on 2008, with reserve wines from 2007 and 2006. The fruit is sourced from Les Hautes Greves and Les Basses Greves, both in Rilly la Montagne. Dosage is 10 grams per liter. Disgorged May 2011. Anticipated maturity: 2011-2015. Vilmart is one of Champagne’s top estates. Proprietor Laurent Champs can be counted on for wines of extraordinary class and elegance. Vilmart is differentiated by the high percentage of Chardonnay in their vineyards. All of the wines are fermented in oak, although you would hardly know that tasting the wines" - Antonio Galloni

Clos Cantenac L’exuberance Rosé 2019 Jeroboam (3L)

R1,060.00 inc. VAT
"The colour is a triumph, a beautifully pale, shimmering salmon pink. A standout in the company of other Bordeaux rose leaving the mouth clean, refreshed and wanting more.” – Hugo Rose, MW

David & Nadia “Aristargos” Magnum 2019

R755.01 inc. VAT
"47% Chenin Blanc, 13% Semillon, 11% Clairette Blanche, 10% Viognier, 8% Marsanne, 6% Roussanne, 3% Verdelho and 2% Grenache Blanc – seven varieties across 15 different vineyards involving 22 pickings. This vintage seems particularly reticent with the nose showing elusive notes of white and yellow fruit plus a little earthiness while the palate is lean, fresh and pithy. Quite challenging at this stage but should no doubt unwind with time in bottle." - Christian Eeded, Winemag

David & Nadia Grenache Magnum 2019

R745.00 inc. VAT
"Grapes from three different vineyards involving six pickings. 60% whole-bunch fermentation. Very pretty aromatics with notes of rose, musk, fresh herbs and red currant. The palate is light-bodied with pure fruit fruit, fresh acidity and fine tannins, the finish lightly salty." - Christian Eededs, Winemag