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Pockets of Pomerol blue clay

Great Domaines Seraphine

Pictured above: Négrette, for once, not asleep

The very early success of Pomerol’s Château Séraphine and Saint-Émilion’s Clos Cantenac has a lot to do with both Martin Krajewski’s business acumen and passion for wine. Martin would eventually leave London and a very successful career behind for a quieter life on the Right Bank of Bordeaux with two châteaux totalling less than ten hectares between them, all run and managed by the family. This was in 2006 and today, we are excited to share news of the release of the 2020 vintage from both Bordeaux addresses. A mixed case of Clos Cantenac for R 3,995 and a limited amount of Séraphine and the second wine, L’Innocence de Séraphine, are available today.

Dear Reader,

For close to thirty years, Hertfordshire-born Martin Krajewski built a very successful business in London which he began in the 1980s. Together with his entrepreneurial flair, Martin has always been an avid art-collector and very passionate about wine. His connection to Bordeaux, and Pomerol in particular, began in 1995 when Martin purchased the rosé-producing Château de Sours in Entre-deux-Mers and completely turned it around.

Forty-five hectares were replanted, another 25 added; they built a new winery, cellars, laboratory, barrel hall and bottling facility, and they entirely redecorated the fine old house, filling it with Krajewski’s world-renowned collection of modern art. Production tripled to 600,000 bottles; the most influential critics – Oz Clarke, Steven Spurrier, Jancis Robinson – were charmed into high praise. Some credited Krajewski with kick-starting the rosé revolution in the early 2000s. 
Adam Lechmere for Jane Anson’s Inside Bordeaux (www.janeanson.com)

What Martin had managed to achieve at Château de Sours caught the attention of Chinese billionaire Jack Ma, who offered Martin a purchase price that was too good to turn down. This was in 2006. Martin, together with his family, went from the 85 hectares of Château de Sours to just shy of 4 hectares between Château Séraphine (2.2 hectares) and Clos Cantenac (1.7 hectares at the time – Martin has since increased the area under vine to 6 hectares).

Château Séraphine

Martin acquired two Pomerol estates, Château Monbrun and Clos Picassou, and combined them to create Château Séraphine. The name is in homage to Martin’s grandmother and his Polish farming heritage. The estate is, therefore, made up of two distinctive vineyard blocks, but still totalling a mere 2.2 hectares. Work in the vineyard is done exclusively by horse for all ploughing and tilling. The team here adopts eco-friendly viticultural practices; preferring to adapt their approach to suit the health and maturity of the vineyards.

93-95 points, Lisa Perrotti-Brown for Wine Advocate
…the 2020 Séraphine sashays out of the glass…

From the strict selection of grapes for the grand vin, those deemed not quite good enough go into the production of the L’Innocence de Séraphine, the estate’s second wine. Both wines are made in the exact same way and both are 100% Merlot.

Of the 2020 vintage, just 3,200 bottles of the grand vin were produced and 3,000 bottles of L’Innocence. 

Great Domaines Pomerol-wine

Clos Cantenac
Saint-Émilion Grand Cru
2020

Appellation Saint-Émilion Grand Cru Contrôlée

3 x bottles

Clos Cantenac
Petit Cantenac Saint-Émilion Grand Cru
2020

Appellation Saint-Émilion Grand Cru Contrôlée

3 x bottles

Clos Cantenac

Previously just an old shed and a forgotten name in Saint-Émilion, Clos Cantenac has been brought back to life by the Krajewski family. Their attention immediately turned to the soil and significant investment went into the vineyards and in renovating the 200-year-old winery.

Expecting great things in the future from this producer, this is a Château to watch!
Lisa Perrotti-Brown for Wine Advocate

Clos Cantenac’s grand vin is 100% Merlot and produced from the oldest vines which are planted in three of the four blocks, totalling just three hectares.

The estate’s second wine, labelled Petit Cantenac, incorporates a small amount of the Cabernet Sauvignon (5%) and Cabernet Franc (5%) planted on the 6-hectare property. The wine undergoes the same treatment as the grand vin, except for the maturation where less new oak is used at 30%.

Of the 2020 vintage, 8,000 bottles of the grand vin were produced and 16,000 bottles of Petit Cantenac. 

Great Domaines Clos Cantenac Mixed Case

Clos Cantenac
Saint-Émilion Grand Cru
2020

Appellation Saint-Émilion Grand Cru Contrôlée

3 x bottles

Clos Cantenac
Petit Cantenac Saint-Émilion Grand Cru
2020

Appellation Saint-Émilion Grand Cru Contrôlée

3 x bottles

With Martin having learnt a thing or two about making Bordeaux rosé, the family puts that experience into the L’exuberance at Clos Cantenac. This is a rosé of 100% Merlot from 3.5 hectares. Chat to your account manager about adding some of the 2021 to your order – or add it to your cart when making your purchase online.

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